Will Miami Change Mass Transit?

Betteridge’s law states that, “Any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no.” While there are exceptions, a headline in the Guardian reading, “Could Miami’s rail project be test model that could change mass transit in US?” isn’t one of them.

The article claims that Miami is installing a new light-rail system being built with the financial support of Hitachi and Ansaldo. None of this is true. What is true is that Miami is spending close to $314 million buying new railcars from Ansaldo (now a subsidiary of Hitachi) that will operate on the city’s 32-year-old heavy-rail system, a system that is such a failure that it should have been scrapped rather than supplied with new and expensive ($2.3 million apiece) railcars.

It’s ironic that a left-wing publication like The Guardian is effectively acting as a corporate mouthpiece for an international conglomerate. But all you have to do is mention the words “public transit” and progressives will fall over themselves to support you no matter how expensive and ridiculous your plans.

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4 thoughts on “Will Miami Change Mass Transit?

  1. C. P. Zilliacus

    The Antiplanner wrote:

    What is true is that Miami is spending close to $314 million buying new railcars from Ansaldo (now a subsidiary of Hitachi) that will operate on the city’s 32-year-old heavy-rail system, a system that is such a failure that it should have been scrapped rather than supplied with new and expensive ($2.3 million apiece) railcars.

    Calling for “freeway tear-downs” has been in vogue among some in recent years. It seems to me that this is a transit line that should be an excellent candidate for replacement by buses and a “tear-down.”

    But all you have to do is mention the words “public transit” and progressives will fall over themselves to support you no matter how expensive and ridiculous your plans.

    I have always considered myself a liberal when it comes to many aspects of public discourse, but unfortunately, you are absolutely correct. Not only do many liberals “fall all over themselves” when it comes to public transit, but they are quick to want to play the turn-back-the-clock game when it comes to [rail] transit technology – otherwise, turning back the clock is an activity that many conservative types are guilty of.

    Running buses on highways that are generally congestion-free because they are priced correctly is nearly always a better deal for everyone – including transit patrons, taxpayers of all shapes and sizes, and even motorists.

  2. JOHN1000

    Hitachi and Ansaldo probably also agreed to donate some $ to NPR. That makes anything you do okay.

    For example, on the California high speed railway, NPR recently called it a “success” when the California High-Speed Rail Authority “won a federal exemption from state environmental rules.”

    If it promotes the progressive agenda, even the environment has to get out of the way of their trains.

  3. metrosucks

    If it promotes the progressive agenda, even the environment has to get out of the way of their trains.

    It could also be a tacit admission that much of the environmental review process is a sham.

  4. prk166

    http://www.businessinsider.com/miamis-new-rail-project-could-change-mass-transit-in-the-us-2016-3


    “The new generation is not in love with the car,” says Carlos Gimenez, mayor of Miami-Dade County. “They’re just as happy to get into a railcar or a bus, or be driven round by an Uber. Cars to them are a hassle whereas for us they were a luxury. It’s a different mindset and we’re seeing more and more in this community.”

    Generation Y is not the new generation. Generation Z is the new generation ( born 1990s+ ; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_Z ).

    Generation Z owns and wants to own and drive cars ( http://www.motortrend.com/news/new-study-suggests-gen-z-interested-driving-gen-y/ ).

    The problem with Generation Y is that they’re H U G E. They’re the frickin’ babyboomers all over again. Just like the babyboomers they’re flooding the job market, there’s too many of them and so they don’t get jobs, get part-time instead of full-time, etc.

    Gen Y has adapted their ethos to reflect their situation. Just like the baby boomers were against Vietnam and those corporate jobs only to give us the quagmire’s of Afghanistan and Iraq and flood the stock market with money, Gen Y will come around to embrace the things that truly make their lives better.

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